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Just in case anyone wants this...

Zhegan

Location: Fargo, ND

Joined: Jan 30 2009

I've only started playing guitar for about a month now, but before I started learning I made a diagram of all the notes on the guitar (up to the 24th frets) since I figured I'd be converting some Midi files into tabs manually down the road.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m152/Zhegan/GuitarNotes.jpg

Not sure if anyone needs it, but I figured I'd post it anyways in case anyone wanted something like this.

I'm pretty new to music so I'm not sure if it's 100% accurate, but I THINK it is.

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Looks accurate to me! The only thing that seems at all odd to me is that octaves traditionally begin at C, not at A, but that's arbitrary and not terribly important.

I like the color coding on your chart. Coloring by octave is a cool idea! I can't use it because I'm a synaesthete and I get confused if notes are the wrong colors, but in fact I made my own charts for that reason. (I can deal with black and white, just not colors.) I actually made a "fake guitar" out of foamboard duct taped to a level, drawn on with magic markers, which serves as a chart I can practice on to quiz myself on where all the notes are. But I finally have the fretboard memorized ^-^ So I've been neglecting it.

Is your chart free to redistribute? Can I put it on my site if I ever get around to making a guitar/bass site like I want to? :-)

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

Zhegan

Location: Fargo, ND

Joined: Jan 30 2009

Absolutely! Feel free to use the chart however you wish :). If you want me to I could change it so the octaves start at C, I still have the PSD file so changing it wouldn't take very long at all.

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Oh that would be cool :-)

I don't have too many guitar things to put online yet. I've got some tabs for scales and such that I made for myself, and a few charts. This is really the one that is most useful to me, apart from the fretboard:

http://auriplane.net/guitar/diatonic.html

I made exercises like this one to help me learn it:

http://www.xtalcy.com/tabs/exercises/guitar_e_major.txt

But it ended up being a lot more useful in my mind just having relocateable patterns, especially since I switch between guitar and different basses all the time. I kind of want to make more learning things and make a little site but I haven't done it yet.

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

hslesperance

Location: Walpole, MA

Joined: Aug 10 2008

Does it even help at all to memorize the entire fretboard?

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Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Yes!

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

hslesperance

Location: Walpole, MA

Joined: Aug 10 2008

In what ways does it actually aid you?

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My Original Songs - https://soundcloud.com/hslesperance

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

TrangOul

Insomaniac

Location: Germany

Joined: Feb 24 2008

Well, maybe it can save you some you some time when you arrange a song (e.g. you don't have to check the playability of every single chord because you just know what works).
But I think it's not worth to actually memorize the whole fret board.

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Okay I'll try to explain. I think it is worth it, just so you know what notes you're playing! I can't imagine playing violin or piano without knowing what notes I was playing. It's not a requirement obviously but it's not useless, either.

Visualizing is probably the biggest one for me. Visualizing notes on the fretboard helps a lot with playing fluidly when improvising, I think, and memorizing the fretboard lets you build (interval, diatonic, pentatonic, triad, arpeggio) patterns off of that. (If you don't learn the fretboard before learning these patterns, you'll have a hard time knowing what notes you're playing, and what notes are accidentals!) But visualizing helps a lot with all aspects of playing, I think.

One basic application of memorizing the fretboard is that you can go from one note on the fretboard, to anywhere else you can play that note--say, an A. (This is an exercise you do to memorize the fretboard; pick a random note, find all of them on the neck.) This makes it easier to change position quickly without losing your place, or to transpose / find another way to play something.

It also helps you construct your own chords / understand chords / figure out what chords you're playing; it helps in communicating with other musicians if you know what you're playing, or if you can play something if they ask you to; it helps reading sheet music or lead sheets, or writing music across multiple instruments.

I'm sure you can skip it because a lot of people do, but it does help. You can do a lot of what I said by ear, too, but that doesn't make it useless to learn the fretboard, either . . .

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

TrangOul

Insomaniac

Location: Germany

Joined: Feb 24 2008

I see your point, yet I don't see why I would want to sit down and study the fretboard. After a few years of guitar lessons one simply has a map of the fretboard in one's head. Without ever trying to memorize it, just through experience.

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Maybe 'cause I'm a dork ;-)

EDIT: I guess I should point out it's not actually all that hard to memorize it, by the way.

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

TrangOul

Insomaniac

Location: Germany

Joined: Feb 24 2008

That's true. And if it helps you, why not? Certainly, there are multiple ways to guitar enlightment. :)

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

Zhegan

Location: Fargo, ND

Joined: Jan 30 2009

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m152/Zhegan/GuitarNotes-1.jpg

Here's the updated version, hopefully it will end up being useful!

Also I saw the picture of your fretboard, spiffy :P.

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

CpxAzn

Lurker

Location: Atlanta, Georgia

Joined: Sep 21 2007

Alright I'm confused. Why is there a need to memorize the fretboard? I also remember someone trying to remember all of the flats on the guitar. I just started getting into theory about a few months ago so I'm sorta confused.

So this is what I know so far.

Basically the major and minor scales are the same thing except the roots are different.
There are seven patterns that make up the major/minor scales because there are 7 tones.
Basically all you have to memorize are these seven patterns because all of the modes are also based off of these.

The C Major scale is pretty much D Dorian since it is one interval up and you moved one mode up. If you wanted to play a C Dorian while you are in C, you move a whole step down to A# Major since its the first mode. C Phrygian is another whole step(Following the 2-2-1-2-2-2-1 intervals) down from A# so it's G# Major. Of course the root note is still C.

You don't really have to shift down to play in that mode.

To sum this up, in order to play in the modes, lets label each mode with a number.
1. Ionian (Major Scale)
2. Dorian
3. Phrygian
4. Lydian
5. Mixolydian
6. Aoelian (Minor Scales)
7. Locrian

If you want to play phrygian, it's the third mode, so play the third pattern of C major where you would usually play the first pattern!

Now lets talk about finding the same note all over the the guitar starting on the low E string. Pick a note. Since the low and high E's are the same, another octave will be on the high E same fret.The next octave from the low e string will skip one string to D and move a whole step up. The next octave from there is skip a string again to B and a 1 whole 1 half step up. The next low octave from there is skip 2 string back and one whole step up. The next octave from there is skip a string and whole step up. And from there, skip a string and go 1 whole 1 half step up and you start over again.

In my opinion, memorizing the 7 patterns of the major scale and the patterns of the octaves will be good enough. I personally like the 3 note per string scale patterns. Also its good to know that 1st fret E string is an F, 3rd fret is a G, 5th fret is an A, 7th fret B, 8th C, 10th, D.

If there is a good reason to memorize all of the flats, or even all of the notes on the guitar, please tell me and I might actually do it!

Sorry if this was a long post!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

yoshistrings

ヨッシー

Location: trapped in an egg

Joined: Oct 29 2007

*yawn*

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

I already gave my reasons. And, I don't think it's a "need", just useful, and I'm not telling you to do it. I think what's most important is that you know what the note you're going to play sounds like before you play it, and learning the fretboard is only part of one way to do that.

I think it's especially helpful if you have perfect pitch, because if you already know what (for example) an A sounds like, then being able to play an A when you want one is nice. I don't know, it just seems kind of fundamental to me, but I can definitely see how it'd be different for other people, because I assume other people think of music differently. It's useful for me!

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

Stamen47

no0bzOrG

Joined: Jun 16 2007

hslesperance said

Does it even help at all to memorize the entire fretboard?

Although classtab.org is an awesome resource, if you're going to delve into the classical guitar repertoire, "memorizing" the fretboard is a must simply for the sake of reading the notes in standard notation. Also, knowing where the notes are is very important for understanding the music you're playing on a theoretical level, which is particularly important for arrangers and composers, and is helpful for performers as it can help with memorization and interpretation. For jazz, it helps you spell chords and to know what you're doing when you improvise, as well as being able to read a melody from a lead sheet. For me, those would be the biggest reasons to familiarize oneself with the fretboard. But it's also important to memorize patterns, especially for scales and chords, particularly for jazz. Just because you know where the notes are doesn't mean you can improvise over the chord changes of a jazz tune. So what it comes down to is what you want to do with guitar. If it's to be a classical or jazz great, it's pretty essential. If it's to play some hearty, simple rock tunes, you can certainly live without it.

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Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Hehe I got bored and made this.

http://auriplane.net/guitar/fretboard/

[EDIT] I suppose I should post the instructions. Or I guess I should add them to the tool or whatever. But anyway:

This is a memorization / visualization / whatever tool. ^-^

You can change the number of frets displayed, the tuning (and number of strings), and sharps or flats.

Mouseover a note and all of that note will be highlighted. Click a note to highlight all of that note in a special color, so you can see note patterns on the fretboard.

Click "hide notes" to help memorize where the notes are; mouse over a note to see if you are right.

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Auriplane!!

Re: Just in case anyone wants this...

Heliographos

Matt Keith

Location: Okemos, MI

Joined: Jan 20 2009

That's pretty cool. It does help to know your fretboard, if not memorize the entire thing. In order to write music effectively, I'd recommend knowing the frets AND knowing how to read sheet music.

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