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so I've been doing a bit of composing lately

Lemoncobbler

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Location: SoCal

Joined: Dec 22 2010

I always wanted to try writing some of my own solo guitar songs with video game themes. I didn't think I knew enough about music theory to even try (I still sort of think this haha) composing something, but like two weeks ago I was bored and decided to try to make something.

Right now the only thing I have to compose with is my actual guitar and guitar pro 5. Its kind of fun though because the songs i'm working on I can actually play when I'm done writing them! These songs are like my first attempt (besides some pathetic attempts after I'd only known guitar for like two months :J) at arranging something, and I want to know where I should go from here, should I start learning keyboard? I hear its easier to compose on a piano. Should I learn to read sheet music?

Critique these, i'm especially worried about these songs sounding same-y or repetitive .(especialy dat first one ahha)
99 Cent Fish Tacos this one has nothing to do with video games, it was the first thing I wrote, its fun to play but its better for steel string than nylon

Quick little warm up waltz
this one probably took like 30-60 minutes to make

Battle with the Sand Golem would play in an epic shadow of the colossus type fight!

The Ruins that Once Were My Town game over music/beginning of the journey theme. I tried recording this one but I was interrupted before I could get a second take for the lead part!

Banquet for the Dead was originally meant to be a fun little festival theme, but after I had written and sent it to a friend they said it had aggressive tones, so I turned it into a festival song for BLOODTHIRSTY ORCS or something like that. I might record this one later. I really like measures 17 and onward.

Unwinding after the Journey a mellow song that would play after some serious progress on the hero's adventure was made. I might reconstruct it later, but for now I don't think it has a lot of potential, so i'm dropping working on it.

this one is supposed to be a cheesy ballady disney song for the two love birds of the game, tried to structure it a bit like eyes on me, this is the one i'm currently working on finishing, not really sure where i'm going to go with it though.

I really like Banquet for the

RexLeRouge

IMPACTO

Joined: Aug 15 2008

I really like Banquet for the dead. I have a thing for triplets.

Imo, learning piano can be pretty interesting. You'd come up with different ideas than with your guitar.
I find piano to be really interesting to compose complex voicing or chord progression. Its not easier to compose on a piano though, its just different.
If by "learning to read sheets" you mean learning some musical theory, then yes you should. It will probably make you aware of a lot of things that you are already doing, and push them further.
Now reading sheet music is cool, but I don't think it will help you composing... (only time I find sheet music useful is when I want to get specific stuff that you can find tabbed).

About your songs, I find them pretty good, but somewhat "forgetable". Like, there's no strong moment or really catchy theme that will make you go like "oh yes, that song that goes like tudududu duduu duudu"

And yeah, someone have been stealing the toilet roll in my dorm quite lot recently too...

=O, wow i like each piece

Clanver

Pixelfingers cant play

Location: Germany, Kiel

Joined: Jan 03 2009

=O, wow i like each piece here~

but i too share the same opinion as Rex.
You should put something to break the flow into it~

not like im one to talk though.

A conscious grasp of theory

musenji

Joined: Feb 02 2010

A conscious grasp of theory is not, not, not not not not not not NOT NECESSARY for composition!

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And then I realized that the chord progression from Chrono Cross's Another World is the same progression as the chorus from Peace of Mind by Boston, and life was never quite the same.

Re: A conscious grasp of theory

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

musenji said

A conscious grasp of theory is not, not, not not not not not not NOT NECESSARY for composition!

I agree. It can be helpful, though!

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Auriplane!!

Re: A conscious grasp of theory

Ennea

humhum..

Location: Germany

Joined: Apr 09 2010

True, I think it was chopin who took a empty sheet, crumpled it and marked the wrinkle connections as notes. A bit of fiddling around with that and the song was finished.

Worked out I guess.

Good lord Ennea, that can't

musenji

Joined: Feb 02 2010

Good lord Ennea, that can't be how he composed regularly. Saying theory is not necessary is very very very different from saying "hey, mix a bunch of random notes together and you're good." I know you know this, it was just a fun example, I know. I'm JUST SAYING. /otherthreadreference

Yeah I thought of adding parenthetically that theory can help. It can also hinder, IF you think "oh but I'm not allowed to do that; it isn't covered in the theory that I know so far."

Dude Lemon I love your taco song! It is not too repetitive in my opinion. You have parallel phrasing that ends differently each time. That is a very common compositional tool! Auriplane used it in Mare Carelia (which actually I was thinking of because of what Rex said).

Rex said that you need a remember-able theme. I would call that a "melody". :p And I agree, having a distinct melody makes a song easier to remember. And I thought of "bwooo, doo doo, doooooo" from Mare Carelia. ;)

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And then I realized that the chord progression from Chrono Cross's Another World is the same progression as the chorus from Peace of Mind by Boston, and life was never quite the same.

I just wanted to bring an

Ennea

humhum..

Location: Germany

Joined: Apr 09 2010

I just wanted to bring an example, of course this wasnt the usual progress of composing lol, just a rough draft. What I meant is that composing is possible even through randomness - if you add creativity to it. It's not some extremly difficult stuff that you have to study hard to archieve something etc.

btw the "good lord" wasn't

musenji

Joined: Feb 02 2010

btw the "good lord" wasn't really aimed at you, it was more, "good lord that's a crazy story!" and then the rest.

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And then I realized that the chord progression from Chrono Cross's Another World is the same progression as the chorus from Peace of Mind by Boston, and life was never quite the same.

Re: I really like Banquet for the

Lemoncobbler

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Location: SoCal

Joined: Dec 22 2010

alright, stronger melodies! I'll take that into consideration since that seems to be the general consensus! ANd yeah my roommate and I are thinking of re-arranging the room to fit a keyboard, at which point i'll totally give piano a crack.

RexLeRouge said

And yeah, someone have been stealing the toilet roll in my dorm quite lot recently too...

I currently live with 5 other girls in a single unit, when their periods sync up and theres no toilet paper this place literally turns into hell.

Strong melodies are a really

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Strong melodies are a really important part of a lot of music. I agree it's a good idea to focus on that.

Keep in mind it's not a requirement, though. You can make good music without them.

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Auriplane!!

I'm sorry but yes you need

Giogiogio4

For all the dreamers: Our planet's dream is not over yet...

Joined: Jun 10 2010

I'm sorry but yes you need theory.

Knowing what chords are in each scale and how they relate to each scale degree is a basic
must. Something that takes hours can easily be done in minutes. It's much easier to listen to a song
and learn the root note of each chord and fill in the gaps rather than trying every to figure out every note
in the chord because you don't know that the 6th note of the major scale ( 1st of the minor scale ) has a minor chord.

You can't break the rules correctly if you don't know the basics. Almost all my entries in the song writing contest
literally are me just sitting down for 5-10 mins. If I listen to a song I like with basic theory lets you figure out what makes your favorite parts so good. That in turn expands your knowledge as well.

You see famous bands who always say they don't know any theory. Then you realize they either copy everyone else or use the same basic chords over and over again. No says you need to be a major in college to learn it, But knowing the basics of chord and song structure and that good stuff opens you up to the rest.

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My Art for sale! : Here

Latest Recording:Man of the World

Or you can just use your ear.

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Or you can just use your ear.

I'm sure Danny Elfman would be amused to learn that you think he just copies pop chords or some bullshit, though. You should send him a letter.

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Auriplane!!

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

Lemoncobbler

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Location: SoCal

Joined: Dec 22 2010

Giogiogio4 said

No says you need to be a major in college to learn it, But knowing the basics of chord and song structure and that good stuff opens you up to the rest.

Well if all I need to know is basic chord and song structure, I think i'm alright for now, I feel like after some time re-arranging preexisting songs for solo guitar, i've developed a decent sense of the way songs are structured, and with more practice arranging my own songs i'll get a better grasp of that too I guess.

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

amz181

Joined: Oct 07 2008

Giogiogio4 said

I'm sorry but yes you need theory.

Knowing what chords are in each scale and how they relate to each scale degree is a basic
must. Something that takes hours can easily be done in minutes. It's much easier to listen to a song
and learn the root note of each chord and fill in the gaps rather than trying every to figure out every note
in the chord because you don't know that the 6th note of the major scale ( 1st of the minor scale ) has a minor chord.

You can't break the rules correctly if you don't know the basics. Almost all my entries in the song writing contest
literally are me just sitting down for 5-10 mins. If I listen to a song I like with basic theory lets you figure out what makes your favorite parts so good. That in turn expands your knowledge as well.

You see famous bands who always say they don't know any theory. Then you realize they either copy everyone else or use the same basic chords over and over again. No says you need to be a major in college to learn it, But knowing the basics of chord and song structure and that good stuff opens you up to the rest.

Not saying I'm a composer guitarist extraordinare (although I quite possibly am), but I have learnt in total 0 scales since starting guitar (except for grades, which were relatively recent), and back when I started guitar, I learnt a few chords, which I very quickly forgot, and now have no recollection of.

And while I wouldn't describe myself as a wandering chinaman, I do think I am semi-competent at composing. This would poke small hole in theory that chord/scales are a basic must.

I will say that more non-guitar-specific music theory does speed up the composing process alot for me. And has given me alot more tools to play with.

@lemon
I LEIK YOUR SONGS MAN, YOU GOOD.

Re: so I've been doing a bit of composing lately

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Lemoncobbler said

Critique these, i'm especially worried about these songs sounding same-y or repetitive .(especialy dat first one ahha)

Crit time!

99 Cent Fish Tacos this one has nothing to do with video games, it was the first thing I wrote, its fun to play but its better for steel string than nylon

This is a really nice song. It has some moments my ear didn't really expect (borrowing the tonic from F in e.g. measure 11), but that's not a bad thing. The intro sounds a bit like Gymnopédie No.1, but then you go somewhere else with it. I think you have a good instinct for songwriting, actually.

The intro should be written in 3/4 time. Listen for it. You can hear the 3/4, can't you? It changes over to 4/4 early on.

Quick little warm up waltz
this one probably took like 30-60 minutes to make

You should learn to hear which key you're in. Mark that in your sheet music. In this case, it's B♭, which has two flats (B and E). You'll notice that some of the notes still have sharps or flats even when you set the correct key. These are called "accidentals". Accidentals aren't necessarily wrong, but you should try to use them *on purpose* when they sound good. You can use them as a hint that you *might* have made a mistake.

In this case, the E naturals (2s on the 4th string, in e.g. measures 6 and 8) don't sound that good to me, so I'd axe them. Personally, I'd change most of them to 3s.

Why don't they sound good? First, they're not in the right key. Sometimes that works, but sometimes it doesn't. Second, they're moving in parallel motion with the bass note--that means that both notes are going downward at the same time. That's okay, but it's a weaker motion than you could use. Worse, they're parallel fifths (parallel motion when the notes are a perfect fifth, meaning "7 semitones" or "7 frets" apart).

What's wrong with parallel fifths? AGAIN, maybe nothing. What happens, though, is that when two notes move together like this, they blend into one voice in your head. They were separate voices before, but now they're doing this weak "we're sorta the same note" kind of thing. If you change them to 3s, then the middle voice stays where it is (keeps playing 3s) while the bass note moves down. This is a lot stronger.

This is an example of how theory could help you.

This song is cute, and overall pleasant to listen to. (Although, I think it's lacking in overall structure.) I particularly like the accidental in measure 28, which should be written as a C♯. I wouldn't change that one! It gives it a lighter-than-air feeling.

The ending is weird. Normally, songs begin and end with the tonic chord of the key they're in. This is a rule you can break, but it's what the ear expects. In this case, you were in B♭, but you ended with a D major chord. The tonic chord is the one with the same name as the key, so if you're in the key of B♭ major, which you are, I expect the song to end on a B♭ major chord.

Battle with the Sand Golem would play in an epic shadow of the colossus type fight!

Is the fourth note of measure 4 a 0 on purpose? It sounds like it should be a 2, but I could see it if you said you did it on purpose.

In measures 22 and 30 and 51, I'd change the B♭s to B natural. (That's the 3 on the 3rd string to a 4.)

This piece has a lot of energy and variation. It keeps pushing forward, which is good. If anything, I think it could use a little overall structure, and MAYBE more emphasis on the main melodies of the song.

Still, this one is really pretty nice. I especially like when you use Dsus4 → D (major). Ending on Dsus4 feels unresolved, though. Anyway, nice job! So far, having listened to three of them, they don't seem samey at all.

The Ruins that Once Were My Town game over music/beginning of the journey theme. I tried recording this one but I was interrupted before I could get a second take for the lead part!

This one is really beautiful. Write it in B minor (two sharps).

In measure 19, I'd change the three middle voice notes to D F♯ D (which are 0 4 0 on the 4th string). Why? It gives the melody a little more breathing room, and I like the chord better. That's just me, though--there's nothing wrong with what you wrote there.

To make a critique? I'd say it could be longer.

Banquet for the Dead was originally meant to be a fun little festival theme, but after I had written and sent it to a friend they said it had aggressive tones, so I turned it into a festival song for BLOODTHIRSTY ORCS or something like that. I might record this one later. I really like measures 17 and onward.

Write this one in E minor (one sharp). You could also write it in E dorian minor (two sharps), because you switch back and forth between the two. The difference is whether you have a C sharp or C natural. I really like the way you switch back and forth--both sound good. This is an example of when you'll have accidentals no matter what key you write it in, but they're not a bad thing.

You could write this in 12/8 or 12/16 if you wanted, since each beat is divided into three sub-beats. This is called "compound time" and is used because just about EVERY beat gets subdivided into thirds.

Notice how in the beginning, you have 3 "voices" moving up together in parallel motion? Didn't I just say that was bad? Worse yet, you've got an octave, too!! Oh no!!

Actually, it's just fine. But notice how these three "voices" actually act as only one voice. When you play a power chord like 022xxx then move it to 244xxx, the upper notes serve to strengthen and reinforce the bass note, but they don't act as independent voices. They blend in, almost as though it's one really strong note. (You can still hear that the middle voice is playing a different note, though, so make sure when you use power chords that middle note doesn't clash with anything!)

Anyway, this is a really good song. It has a very strong pulse, it's always pushing forward to the next section (very important!), and the interplay between the dorian and aeolian (natural minor) sections gives it a nice epic, emotional feeling. You did a really good job with this one.

Unwinding after the Journey a mellow song that would play after some serious progress on the hero's adventure was made. I might reconstruct it later, but for now I don't think it has a lot of potential, so i'm dropping working on it.

You start out in an inversion. The chord you're playing sounds almost like C major, but you play an A instead of G, so instead it sounds like Am/C (that means A minor, but with a C as the lowest note). It feels a little weird to me to start the song on an inversion like this, let alone stay in the inversion.

When I change the song to C major by moving the A to G (2 to 0 on the third string) it sounds like the song has a more solid foundation. I wouldn't blame you if you thought that made it sound more boring, though--it does. If I change the bass note to A instead, it sounds cool to me. I'm not saying you have to do that, of course. I'm just making an observation about the inversion.

I think an understanding of theory would help you construct songs in this vein that you're happier with. I do think it has some potential, though.

this one is supposed to be a cheesy ballady disney song for the two love birds of the game, tried to structure it a bit like eyes on me, this is the one i'm currently working on finishing, not really sure where i'm going to go with it though.

Write this song in D major (two sharps).

In some places in this song, the voices move in parallel octaves. Much like parallel fifths, rather than sounding like independent notes, the voices seem to join into one *stronger* voice. This can be good, or it can be bad. It's up to you to decide if it works. I'd caution you to pay attention to the individual voices in your song, and listen for when voices appear or disappear, merge together into one or separate out into two.

Sometimes it's helpful to think about your music as though you had several voices singing together, one voice for each part. What would each person sing?

Actually, I think you'd get a lot out of studying voice leading and counterpoint. They'd help you write stronger songs, IMO.

In any case, this is a pretty nice song, but I'm zonked from listening to so many in a row and trying to write meaningful things about each one. So, I'm basically useless by now. Hope I managed to say something helpful along the way :-)

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Auriplane!!

What is 12/6 time?

musenji

Joined: Feb 02 2010

What is 12/6 time?

[edit] I'm kidding, I'm KIDDING, it's a joke. :p

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And then I realized that the chord progression from Chrono Cross's Another World is the same progression as the chorus from Peace of Mind by Boston, and life was never quite the same.

Oh boy, theory always comes

hslesperance

Location: Walpole, MA

Joined: Aug 10 2008

Oh boy, theory debates always comes up in these threads. People like to point out Uematsu, The Beatles, or Hendrix to prove that you don't need theory. And while they couldn't read music or name scales and chord progressions, they still understand fundamentals of theory just by "the feel" from experimenting with what chords work together and recognizing patterns. Don't ever think that you can't write a song just becuse you don't know enough theory. My music theory teacher said "music is communication through sound" or something similar; as long as your songs communicate and resonate with the listener then the amount of theory applied doesn't matter. But if you want to learn it bit more theory that's great too and can help with composing.

I was also going to say you should have stronger melodies. Certain genres don't need them but the types of songs you wrote should probably have a more memorable, hummable melody. One way I've found to write a catchy melody is somthing Kondo likes to do a lot. Take Zelda's Lullaby for example.

e--------------------------------5---3----------
B--0---3---------0---3-----0---3-------3---1-0--
G--------2---0-2-------2-----------------------2
D-----------------------------------------------
A-----------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------

Notice that the first 12 notes are the same in both of these staves. In the first the melody goes downward after that 12th note. And in the second it goes upward. Repeating the first part reinforces the beginning of the melody , making it more memorable, and then offers some variation the second time around.

e--------------------------------5---3-10
B--0---3---------0---3-----0---3---------
G--------2---0-2-------2-----------------
D----------------------------------------
A----------------------------------------
E----------------------------------------

Here's another one. From here

The first five notes are the same each time. Then the melody goes down the first time and upward the second. This probably goes without saying, but you can go down the first time and up the second, these two examples just happen to both go down then up.

e--------------0---2----------------------------0---2-7--------------
B---0--3----1--------3---------------0--3----1-----------------------
G--------------------------------------------------------------------
D--------------------------------------------------------------------
A--------------------------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm not good at critiquing, but it looks like Auri has that covered. I really like Battle with the Sand Golem, can you play that at tempo?

And did you write ALL of these in TWO WEEKS? Maybe I'm slow and lazy but that seems fast if you have never composed before!

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My Original Songs - https://soundcloud.com/hslesperance

A typo for 12/16. Sorry

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

A typo for 12/16. Sorry about that--I'll go edit it.

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Auriplane!!

Holymoly what happened here ?

Ennea

humhum..

Location: Germany

Joined: Apr 09 2010

Holymoly what happened here ? So much wisdom, my brain hurts D:

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

Giogiogio4

For all the dreamers: Our planet's dream is not over yet...

Joined: Jun 10 2010

Lemoncobbler said

Giogiogio4 said

No says you need to be a major in college to learn it, But knowing the basics of chord and song structure and that good stuff opens you up to the rest.

Well if all I need to know is basic chord and song structure, I think i'm alright for now, I feel like after some time re-arranging preexisting songs for solo guitar, i've developed a decent sense of the way songs are structured, and with more practice arranging my own songs i'll get a better grasp of that too I guess.

If you know your triads,chord shapes M,m,Dim,Aug,min7,M7,Sus4 and that jazz,scales ( modes all the same scale pretty much ) and degrees then for the most part your good.

When you know your theory you know how to use the best of your knowledge to get the best of out each chord. You think Hans Zimmer wings it or uses his theory? When you start learning songs you are taking the best of those songs into your musical memory. But if you never know what makes them important then you will end up just rehashing them. Look at the KH soundtrack or NIER, tons of complicated and thought out chord progressions. Dearly Beloved is so simple yet extremely powerful.

An Ear that is used with theory will go much farther.
" I can use my fingers why do I need to take math classes", " I have eyes why use a map?" mentality at it's finest. I honestly have not really read a Tab entirely in a few years. I skim it over, Look at the tuning and the bass notes and position of some chords and can figure out the melody in a few mins based simply on the scales. Before I would have to rely on every note in the tab to know where things were. Now I do whats best for me.

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My Art for sale! : Here

Latest Recording:Man of the World

gio has managed to once again

Jacob31593

Location: Tampa, FL

Joined: Jan 04 2009

gio has managed to once again prove that he and his ways are much superior to the rest of the world

Re: I really like Banquet for the

karathrow

Joined: Oct 26 2010

Lemoncobbler said

I currently live with 5 other girls in a single unit, when their periods sync up and theres no toilet paper this place literally turns into hell.

*puts down sandwich*

THANKS LEMON.

Also this is a cool thread. It's not often we get discussions that are this substantive plus having actual original content. I've wanted to write some stuff myself but been rather clueless so this was a good read.

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

yashakenkyaku

Joined: Nov 24 2009

Giogiogio4 said

I'm sorry but yes you need theory.

Knowing what chords are in each scale and how they relate to each scale degree is a basic
must. Something that takes hours can easily be done in minutes. It's much easier to listen to a song
and learn the root note of each chord and fill in the gaps rather than trying every to figure out every note
in the chord because you don't know that the 6th note of the major scale ( 1st of the minor scale ) has a minor chord.

You can't break the rules correctly if you don't know the basics. Almost all my entries in the song writing contest
literally are me just sitting down for 5-10 mins. If I listen to a song I like with basic theory lets you figure out what makes your favorite parts so good. That in turn expands your knowledge as well.

You see famous bands who always say they don't know any theory. Then you realize they either copy everyone else or use the same basic chords over and over again. No says you need to be a major in college to learn it, But knowing the basics of chord and song structure and that good stuff opens you up to the rest.

I don't mean to beat a dead horse; I'm just voicing my opinion. While I won't say completely throw theory out the window, I will say some of my favorite composers didn't know it. ^_^;; Jimi Hendrix had minimal knowledge of theory. Its more about liking what you hear rather than being trapped in a system. Also; learning theory without learning how to use it properly will bog you down. e.e

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

Giogiogio4

For all the dreamers: Our planet's dream is not over yet...

Joined: Jun 10 2010

I'm not saying anyone is wrong. Just going about it blindly isn't that great.

A Composer is much different than a musician or song writer. You write music with your inner ear, You arrange it with theory.Using chords in general is theory! triads and scales and all the things we use day to day was established in western music and is apart of theory. So saying going all ear is still wrong because at the end of the day your using your ears to end up at the same place theory gets you.

You can count by ones all day on your fingers. Or study a little bit and use Multiplication to get the job done quicker.

It's always better to encourage players to seek knowledge. I know too many guitarist who don't take the time to learn it and waste so much time figuring out things that would take 5 mins if they knew their chords.. Theory isn't that hard to understand. It just takes time for it to soak in. And like every other Theory, It's never fully understood.
Guitar takes allot of time to get skillful, But so does theory. if you don't develop them side by side and enjoy the ride then what happens when you get the skill with noways to properly use it?

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My Art for sale! : Here

Latest Recording:Man of the World

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

yashakenkyaku

Joined: Nov 24 2009

Firstly!! I'd like to say comparing math to music is like comparing Apples to Parsnips. >.> (Parsnips are so horribly misunderstood. ;_; )I'm not sure what you got out of what I said. >.> I was trying to say there's no need to go through some complex theoretical analysis if you hear something you like. ^_^ You can dissect the notes and such, but if you try to think outside the box too much, you'll end up with a blank mind in a room full of empty boxes. @[email protected] A chord is just 2 or more notes played together. >.> You put a LOT more emphasis on them than you need to. I never once said, "go all by ear; that's the only way. ever." To my chagrin, I should say, not everyone has the time to learn up on theory. Its a good thing they have the rest of their lives to learn it though. XD

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

Giogiogio4

For all the dreamers: Our planet's dream is not over yet...

Joined: Jun 10 2010

There are some interesting methods that do use math to breakdown the whole fret board.

A chord is what gives a melody it's power. The more knowledge you have of them the more you can get out of a simple melody.Used correctly a 3 note passage can have more power than a 50 note one. Voicing those chords and using altered inversions adds even more to the structure and brings out more.

An artist can spend hours drawing a simple image while a knowledge pro can do one 200Xs better in shorter the time.

No knowledge link

Someone who took the time to learn and sharpen the basics.
Link

I'm just saying that it's a waste to not look at theory and learn to use it to improve your understanding of music. The resources available online are endless. Learning songs and chord shapes are great and all, but learning what makes them tick gives them even more value to your playing.

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My Art for sale! : Here

Latest Recording:Man of the World

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

yashakenkyaku

Joined: Nov 24 2009

I'll let you have the last word after this; because more than likely you will. You just argue for the sake of arguing, man. ^_^ There's no great point to be made here; I even said in my first post it was my opinion; not fact. I liked the first picture better anyway. XD There are only 12 notes in the Western Musical Universe. Playing 2 or more of these at a time is a chord; there's not much more thought that needs to go into them. o.0 If you're playing in a key, then you know what you have to play with. (7 of 12 notes; you technically have of 58.33% chance of hitting a right note at random. XD)I'm not saying that's what you should do. You shouldn't be afraid of mistakes as that's how a lot of artists learn their own licks. Also; not everyone plans to be a virtuoso; some people just want to learn a song or two and end it at that.

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

SalemJenet

Joined: Sep 22 2011

I like to quote walls of text too ;3
edit: Contributing a little I know some music theory knowledge but never put it to use when composing. Except throwing some random notes that fit the key sometimes to see what I get. Not that any of my compositions are longer than 20 measures tho ;A;
edit reloaded: Ok that wasn't contributing at all ;u;

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

yashakenkyaku

Joined: Nov 24 2009

Well some of my other hobbies include; playing guitar, long walks on the beach, and leaving orphans locked inside burning churches. ^_~

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

Ranulf

I will not join your gametabs.

Joined: Oct 15 2009

yashakenkyaku said

...and leaving orphans locked inside burning churches. ^_~

This, friends, is a cry for help. *whispers*I'll pray for you. Not really. I should do something productive.

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

RexLeRouge

IMPACTO

Joined: Aug 15 2008

Giogiogio4 said

I'm not saying anyone is wrong.

I edited those posts to

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

I edited those posts to remove the quotes. Because the posts directly followed what they were quoting, they weren't really necessary, and I figured it'd be easier to read this way.

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Auriplane!!

what the fuck happened

Lemoncobbler

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Location: SoCal

Joined: Dec 22 2010

what the fuck happened here
thanks to everyone who offered real critique, someone else mentioned that I should study voice counterpoint too, so I think that's something I will definitely look into for now.

Keep in mind that classical

auriplane

Joined: Sep 06 2008

Keep in mind that classical theory was an early attempt to describe what the greats did. That is, theory came after practice and merely attempts to describe it. In many cases, you can describe things in more than one theoretical framework, and there is no one "correct" way, though you can make arguments about the utility of one description over another. Theory is not sacrosanct.

My point being: don't try to learn theory as "right" and "wrong". Try to learn theory as a tool. Use it when it helps; ignore it when it doesn't.

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Auriplane!!

Re: Keep in mind that classical

musenji

Joined: Feb 02 2010

Oh yeah Auri? And what composing did YOU ever do, huh? It...you...oh. Your sig. I'll show myself out.

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And then I realized that the chord progression from Chrono Cross's Another World is the same progression as the chorus from Peace of Mind by Boston, and life was never quite the same.

Re: I'm sorry but yes you need

yashakenkyaku

Joined: Nov 24 2009

Ranulf said

yashakenkyaku said

...and leaving orphans locked inside burning churches. ^_~

This, friends, is a cry for help. *whispers*I'll pray for you. Not really. I should do something productive.

I believe you got me wrong, good sir. >.> The dead birds on people's doorsteps were cries for help. Ah, to be 16 again. ^_^

Thank you for your input, Auri. I agree.

Oh; I really like your compositions Lemon. I almost forgot to say so. ^_^;;